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Glynn Rifle, and a shooting

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Catalog Information

Title
Glynn Rifle, and a shooting
Accession Number
2018.001.0001
Type
Artifact
Gift of
David Ballou
Collection Title
Glynn Rifle
Collection Description
Rifle made 1850's-1860's by Edgar Morris Glynn
Source
Donation by David Ballou
Format Description
*
Search Engine Type
Thing

This .36 caliber muzzle loader rifle was made by Edgar Morris Glynn (1830 - 1887), the youngest of 5 children born to Samuel A. Glynn (1795 - 1852), a War of 1812 veteran, and Mary A. Eddy (1798 - 1896).  Edgar was a gunsmith in Clarendon, appearing as such in the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses.  An 1845 E.M.Glynn Gunsmith counterstamped coin indicates Edgar may have been making guns as a teenager.  His father was a blacksmith, with Edgar taking over the shop upon Samuel's passing in 1852. 

Below is a photo of the reverse side of the rifle and an ad from 1863 for his services as a gunsmith.

Edgar married twice, first to Persis Ormsbee (1836 - 1862) with whom he had a son Lewis and second to Mary Ann Horton (1846 - 1932) with whom he had 7 children.  We don't know what became of the blacksmith/gunsmith shop after Edgar's passing.  The structure itself is long gone as is Edgar's home. Edgar was of age to serve in the Civil War but he paid the $300 commutation fee to get out of the draft in 1863. 

There is much we don't know about Edgar's life but we do know that on June 17, 1882 he shot his son-in-law William Gould (1862-1926) of Shrewsbury, husband of Edgar's oldest daughter Leona (1863-1944).  A copy of the newspaper article from June 22, 1882 describes the event and an article from July 13, 1882 talks about his being in jail pending making bond.   Leona and William's 1st child (and Edgar's 1st grandchild) Simon Gould (1882 - 1938) had been born about a month prior to the shooting.  The final attachment is from Oct. 12, 1882 showing that Edgar did go to trial and that as the 2nd day of proceedings the jury hadn't yet rendered a verdict. Whatever the actual outcome, innocent, guilty, or deadlocked jury, it wasn't newsworthy enough to be recorded  in the Rutland Herald court reports after the trial concluded. 

See the "Glynn vs Gould" entry in the Events collection for more info on this shooting and on a subsequent shooting in 1889.

The rifle shown was owned by Newman Wendell Weeks (1907-1991), a school teacher born in Clarendon and living in Wallingford at the time of his death.  He was the son of Robert Henry Weeks (1882-1923) and Delia Crossman (1868 -1958) and husband of Elizabeth Bradbury Cornell (1911 - 1991).  After N. Wendell's passing the gun was preserved by David Ballou of Wallingford until its donation to the historical society.

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